Philosophical clarity will have the same effect on the growth of mathematics as sunlight has on the growth of potato shoots. (In a dark cellar they grow yards long.) — Wittgenstein
Nothing seems to me less likely than that a scientist or mathematician who reads me should be seriously influenced in the way he works.

Wittgenstein, with his characteristic foresight.

In other words, scientists and mathematicians get along just fine without trying to find foundations for their work. Reading Wittgenstein will tell them what they had already supposed.

If a person tells me he has been to the worst places I have no right to judge him, but if he tells me it was his superior wisdom that enabled him to go there, then I know he is a fraud. — Ludwig Wittgenstein talking about Russell’s views (expressed in the book Marriage and Morals) on marriage and morality
Well, God has arrived. I met him on the 5.15 train. — Keynes in a letter dated 18 January 1929, on Wittgenstein’s return to England.
Every day I think of Pinsent. He took half my life away with him. The devil will take the other half. — Wittgenstein writing to Russell on his depression since David Pinsent’s death in an airplane crash.
Either my piece is a work of the highest rank, or it is not a work of the highest rank. In the latter (and more probable) case I myself am in favour of it not being printed. And in the former case it’s a matter of indifference whether it’s printed twenty or a hundred years sooner or later. After all, who asks whether the Critique of Pure Reason, for example, was written in 17x or y. — Wittgenstein’s rationalization of his inability to get the Tractatus published, even after Russell had written an introduction to it.

Wittgenstein on his service in WWI

'Now I have the chance to be a decent human being', he wrote on the occasion of his first glimpse of the enemy, 'for I'm standing eye to eye with death.'

'Perhaps', he wrote, 'the nearness of death will bring light into life. God enlighten me.'

Wittgenstein’s donations pt. II

Of only three of the beneficiaries can one say with any certainty that both knew of their work and admired it: Loos, Rilke and Trakl. And even here we must add the provisos that, though he admired the tone of Trakl’s work, he professed himself incapable of understanding it; that he came to dislike Rilke’s later poetry; and that, after the war, he denounced Loos as a charlatan.

Nevertheless, Rilke’s letter of thanks he described as ‘kind’ and ‘noble’:

[It] both moved and deeply gladdened me. The affection of any noble human being is a support in the unsteady balance of my life. I am totally unworthy of the splendid present which I carry over my heart as a sign and remembrance of this affection. If you could only convey my deepest thanks and my faithful devotion to Rilke.

Wittgenstein gives large sum of inheritance to Ludwig von Ficker to allocate to artists in need pt. I

It is very doubtful whether he knew the work of most of the artists whom he helped, and still more doubtful that he would have admired it if he had. From his responses to the letters of gratitude that were passed on to him by Ficker, there is no sign at all of any admiration for most of these artists, and, indeed, his reactions reveal a certain disdain for the whole business. The first such letter he received was from Dallago. Wittgenstein sent it straight back to Ficker: ‘I do not know whether you have any use for it, but I am returning it anyway.’ And when he was later sent a collection of such letters, he returned them all, saying that he did not need them as documents, and: ‘as thanks they were—to be frank—for the most part highly distasteful to me. A certain degrading, almost swindling tone—etc.’

'Once I helped him financially without really meaning to', he later told Paul Engelmann. In gratitude, Ehrenstein had sent him two of his books, Tubutsch and Man Screams, which Wittgenstein declared were: ‘just muck if I’m not mistaken’.

'Once I helped him financially without really meaning to', he later told Paul Engelmann. In gratitude, Ehrenstein had sent him two of his books, Tubutsch and Man Screams, which Wittgenstein declared were: ‘just muck if I’m not mistaken’.